Slimes

The most common addition to slime is a color. Your plain, DIY slime will most likely come out as clear or white, depending on your ingredients. But you’ll only see beautifully colored slimes all over the internet and Instagram. Color is one of the most important components of your slime. Especially when you are showing off your slime on Instagram. Others can’t feel the texture of your slime through the screen but they can ooh and aah at the way you see the slime catches the light. Color changing slime isĀ  really interesting to play with. The color comes from thermochromic pigment, which changes color with temperature. So mix one of these color changing pigment powders and alternate between heating it up (by stretching it vigorously or placing it under a lamp) and cooling it back down.

Ruby Red Slime Pigment Powder

Yes, we already discussed pigment powders. But glow in the dark pigments deserve its own category. Party loving and fun loving slimers alike will definitely find these enticing. These can be found in powder form across many different colors. First, shine a light onto the pigment-infused slime. This energizes the crystals of the pigment and stores up energy. Then, you can cloak the slime in darkness and the phosphors in the pigment will slowly emit the stored energy with a stunning glow. Don’t forget the first step, or you’ll be wondering why the glow-in-the-dark is not working.

What could be more fun than playing with snow? You might have a little artificial snow left from last Christmas’s crafts shopping. Rather than throw it out, be creative and use it as an ingredient for your slime projects. Fake snow is shimmery and very light-weight, which means you get to create a light and fluffy slime and it only takes just a few minutes to whip up. It maintains the stretchiness of the slime without overwhelming the original texture of the slime.